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Scott Esposito

Scott Esposito is the co-author of The End of Oulipo? (with Lauren Elkin; Zero Books, 2013). His writing has appeared recently in Music & Literature, Drunken Boat, and The Point. His criticism appears frequently in the Times Literary Supplement, the San Francisco Chronicle, and The Washington Post.



Articles Available Online


The Last Redoubt

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November 2014

Scott Esposito

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November 2014

As they say of politics, I have found essay-writing to be the art of the possible. Certain work can only be done in those...

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February 2014

Another Way of Thinking

Scott Esposito

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February 2014

I. There is no substitute for that moment when a book places into our mind thoughts we recognise as our...

The titular work of Sadie Benning’s solo exhibition ‘Sleep Rock’ at Camden Arts Centre takes its name from two images contained within it: a large hand clenched around a rock and an old photograph of a woman asleep in bed The woman has entered the ephemeral, fluid state of sleep Her fingers, mirroring the ones that grasp the rock, are closed in on themselves, making a soft, lethargic fist This dualism crystallises the precarious ‘in between’ states of transition and unconsciousness that reoccur throughout Benning’s practice   Sleep Rock is one of 19 new wall-based works (all 2018) which constitute Benning’s first solo show in the UK Incorporating wood, resin, enamel, photographs, hand-drawn imagery and transparencies, the works are a hybrid of painting, photography and sculptural relief Polished, heavy and projecting at least two centimetres from the wall, Benning’s objects have been slowly accreted over time Photographs and drawings are suspended between layers of resin so distinct they cast internal shadows This accumulative process distills and creates relationships: images are read next to, over or through one another All entombed in a reflective resin casing, Benning’s compositions offer up a multitude of associations and the inescapable reflection of your own face   Juxtaposing unsettling, familiar and nostalgic imagery, Benning’s resin vignettes exist on the verge of nightmare In Out of the Bag, lurid orange smiley faces are applied over a cartoonish, purple-grouted brick wall At the very surface of the work sits a vintage photograph of two white cats emerging from a suitcase, with a caption that reads ‘letting the cats out of the bag’ Since the 1960s, the smiley symbol has been adopted as an emblem in advertising, children’s TV, adult comic books, acid house culture and at least one series of murders Set against a brick wall – a familiar backdrop used in live standup comedy – and overlaid with a crude cat joke, they manifest as an ode to enforced, synthetic cheerfulness   Since the late 1980s Benning has been known for their experimental videos, which they began making as a teenager on a Fischer-Price Pixelvision toy camera Often recorded in the artist’s bedroom,

Contributor

August 2014

Scott Esposito

Contributor

August 2014

Scott Esposito is the co-author of The End of Oulipo? (with Lauren Elkin; Zero Books, 2013). His writing has...

Negation: A Response to Lars Iyer's 'Nude in Your Hot Tub'

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September 2012

Scott Esposito

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September 2012

I do not know whether I have anything to say, I know that I am saying nothing; I do not know if what I...
Art's Fading Sway: Russian Ark by Aleksandr Sokurov

Art

May 2012

Scott Esposito

Art

May 2012

I have often fallen asleep in small theatres. It is an embarrassing thing to have happen during one-man shows, and I am certain that...

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Art

Issue No. 8

A Fictive Retrospective of the Bruce High Quality Foundation

Legacy Russell

Art

Issue No. 8

Here are some details of art history that may or may not be true:   In 2008 I was...

Interview

December 2011

Interview with David Graeber

Ellen Evans & Jon Moses

Interview

December 2011

Six months ago, while preparing to interview David Graeber, I decided to conduct some brief internet research on the...

fiction

May 2017

Gloria

Aaron Peck

fiction

May 2017

Bernard, whenever he thought of Geoffrey, would remember his gait on the afternoon of their first meeting. Geoffrey walked...

 

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