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Rosanna Mclaughlin
Rosanna Mclaughlin is an editor at The White Review.

Articles Available Online


Ariana and the Lesbian Narcissus

Essay

April 2019

Rosanna Mclaughlin

Essay

April 2019

‘Avoid me not!’ ‘Avoid me not!’                                   Narcissus   Let me describe a GIF I’ve been watching. A lot. Ariana Grande is dressed in...

Art Review

November 2018

Ten Years at Garage Moscow

Rosanna Mclaughlin

Art Review

November 2018

When I arrive in Moscow, I am picked up from the airport by Roman, a patriotic taxi driver sent...

There are at least three Brian Evensons, all of them EXCEEDINGLY IMPROBABLE First, there’s Brian Evenson, the prolific author of crisp, often disturbing novels and short stories, whose first collection Altmann’s Tongue famously scandalised his employers at Brigham Young University and led to his resignation from the Mormon Church Then there’s B K Evenson, the sci-fi novelist behind books set in the Aliens and Dead Space universes and co-writer of the novelisation of Rob Zombie’s film The Lords of Salem Finally, there’s Brian Evenson, the translator of prestigious French fiction, including the charming and deeply strange novella In the Time of the Blue Ball, a book ascribed to Manuela Draeger, who does not exist It might seem like an uphill struggle for any book of ‘weird fiction’ to improve on the weird facts, but Evenson manages it with novels like Last Days, about a one-handed detective who becomes a prophet to an amputation cult, and stories like ‘Any Corpse,’ which opens with the line ‘When she awoke, a shower of raw flesh had fallen in the field’ This is not to suggest that Evenson’s work is at all unworldly: his 2008 novel The Open Curtain revisits the dark history of the LDS Church, while the horror permeating his short stories owes less to Lovecraftian beasties and more to the combination of an abiding uncertainty and the author’s lucid prose   Lately, all these Evensons seem to be operating in uneasy equilibrium The stories that comprise A Collapse of Horses – published by Coffee House Press along with reissues of three of his novels – venture into increasingly dark, even apocalyptic, terrain while maintaining a narrative control that owes at least as much to the experimental spirit of the Oulipo as to the usual suspects of American weird (Poe, Bowles, Burroughs) The narrator of his latest novella, The Warren, forthcoming from Torcom in September, may or may not be human, and leaves a place of relative safety to explore a mysterious, devastated landscape where identity itself is on the line As usual, Evenson persistently disarms his readers even as his fans recognise the crystallisation of his

Contributor

July 2016

Rosanna Mclaughlin

Contributor

July 2016

Rosanna Mclaughlin is an editor at The White Review.

Becoming Alice Neel

Art

August 2017

Rosanna Mclaughlin

Art

August 2017

From the first time I saw Alice Neel’s portraits, I wanted to see the world as she did. Neel was the Matisse of the...

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Interview

Issue No. 1

Interview with Will Self

Jacques Testard

Interview

Issue No. 1

Standing on the doorstep of Will Self’s London home ahead of this interview, last August, I was quite terrified....

Art

September 2014

On the Ground

Teju Cole

Art

September 2014

I visited Palestine in early June 2014, just before the latest wave of calamity befell its people. For eight...

feature

Issue No. 18

The Disquieting Muses

Leslie Jamison

feature

Issue No. 18

I.     In Within Heaven and Hell (1996), Ellen Cantor’s voice-over tells the story of a doomed love...

 

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