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Chris Newlove Horton
Chris Newlove Horton is a writer living in London.

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DATE NIGHT

Prize Entry

April 2016

Chris Newlove Horton

Prize Entry

April 2016

He said, ‘Tell me about yourself.’ He said, ‘Tell me about you.’ He said, ‘Tell me everything. I’m interested.’ He said, ‘I want to...

fiction

April 2015

Heavy

Chris Newlove Horton

fiction

April 2015

It is a two lane road somewhere in North America. The car is pulled onto the shoulder with the...

I do not know whether I have anything to say, I know that I am saying nothing; I do not know if what I might have to say is unsaid because it is unsayable (the unsayable is not buried inside writing, it is what prompted it in the first place); I know that what I say is blank, is neutral, is a sign, once and for all, of a once-and-for-all annihilation —Georges Perec, W, or the Memory of Childhood     If Reality Hunger by David Shields represents one strand of literary prognostication to which Perec’s writing offers a fruitful response, there is another strand that Perec answers just as well: those gleeful prophets of the novel’s death   In order to tell this story we need to take a step back Perec’s writing was in sync with its times in the sense that it partook in the epic process of cultural commodification occurring over the second half of the twentieth century Products, beliefs and fashions that once existed on the boundaries of society were resolutely transformed into mass consumable versions that were bought up by the middle classes Things, Perec’s best-selling popularisation of the bohemian lifestyle, is one example of how he was part of this process Another would be Life A User’s Manual, which transmutes into literary gold hundreds of things that one would have never thought to put in a literary novel beforehand   One important thing Perec helped commodify was negation Negation was a huge thing in the 1960s, when Perec began to write It informed and empowered the groups then fighting against capitalistic culture In his essay ‘E Unibus Pluram,’ David Foster Wallace put forth the argument that the second half of the twentieth century was a time of two great changes: first, the development of this ‘no’ of resistance against capitalistic culture, and second, the co-opting of this ‘no’ of resistance into a catchy sales pitch Wallace identified the ‘no’ of resistance with irony—long a potent weapon of the oppressed—and then he went on to argue that the appeal of this irony had been taken

Contributor

August 2014

Chris Newlove Horton

Contributor

August 2014

Chris Newlove Horton is a writer living in London.

James Richards: Not Blacking Out...

Art

December 2011

Chris Newlove Horton

Art

December 2011

Artist James Richards appropriates audio-visual material gathered from a range of sources, which he then edits into elaborate, fragmented collages.   But whereas his...

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fiction

Issue No. 3

Fifteen Flowers

Federico Falco

TR. Janet Hendrickson

fiction

Issue No. 3

To Lilia Lardone Summer was ending. The air already smelled like smoke, but it still looked clear, sunny. The...

fiction

January 2015

The Vegetarian

Han Kang

TR. Deborah Smith

fiction

January 2015

Originally published as three separate novellas, the second of which secured the prestigious Yi Sang prize, The Vegetarian has...

Prize Entry

April 2016

Mute Canticle

Leon Craig

Prize Entry

April 2016

Giulio the singing fascist came to pick me up from the little airport in his Jeep. He made sure...

 

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