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Alex Quicho
Alex Quicho is the author of Small Gods (Zero Books, 2021), a book on the terror and transcendence of drone technology. She has written for the White Review, the New Inquiry, Wired, Vogue, Bookforum, and others, and worked with institutions including Singapore Art Museum, Power Station of Art (Shanghai), Julia Stoschek Collection (Berlin), Somerset House (London), Rennie Museum (Vancouver), and Nationalgalerie (Berlin). She is an associate lecturer in speculative futures at Central Saint Martins.

Articles Available Online


Without World

Essay

June 2023

Alex Quicho

Essay

June 2023

‘I had to create a world of my own, like a climate, a country, an atmosphere in which I could breathe, reign, and recreate...

Art Review

December 2020

End Times: Heather Phillipson’s ‘The End’

Alex Quicho

Art Review

December 2020

A huge swirl of whipped cream, garnished with a drone, a fly, and a maraschino cherry: so insistent that...

Fanny Howe’s bibliography is as bewildering as her itinerant biography Born in 1940 in Buffalo, New York, the poet and author grew up in Cambridge, Massachusetts, before moving an estimated thirty times in six decades – spiralling around New York, Massachusetts and California states, with volleys to Ireland, where her talented mother, Mary Manning, was born and raised – only to settle back in Cambridge in her seventies Howe’s books, all fifty (at least) of them, track these moves: as she suggests in this interview, place informs her writing ‘completely, like being dropped in water It is the environment’ With a majority of her books – published by independent and experimental presses – out of print, to be a reader of Fanny Howe is to be a seeker   ‘[T]he greatest writer there is,’ wrote Eileen Myles of Howe, who has, however, eschewed fame Her humility is active, her obscurity intentional She rarely grants interviews and undermines the authority others might claim given her talents and family A ‘long-tailed’ Bostonian, ‘[s]he can trace her lineage back to the Mayflower,’ wrote her daughter, acclaimed author Danzy Senna (whose husband, Percival Everett, was interviewed in The White Review No 28), of Fanny, whose father was a Harvard professor and a civil rights lawyer and mother a playwright and film pioneer Samuel Beckett was a family friend of her mother Susan Howe, Fanny’s older sister, is as renowned for her poetry as are her children for their art: R H Quaytman, painting, and Mark von Schlegell, science fiction   Though Fanny Howe inherited wealths of history, politics, art and culture, such privileges and responsibilities came with neither money nor property ‘There were many women like me,’ she reflects in The Wedding Dress: Meditations on Word and Life (University of California Press, 2003), ‘born into white privilege but with no financial security, given a good education but no training for survival’ In essays, Howe stories the difficulties of raising three children alone – divorced from their father, the Black American writer Carl Senna – in a nation defined by the violent exploitation of minorities Through teaching,

Contributor

July 2018

Alex Quicho

Contributor

July 2018

Alex Quicho is the author of Small Gods (Zero Books, 2021), a book on the terror and transcendence of...

Emily Pope, The Sitcom Show

Art Review

July 2018

Alex Quicho

Art Review

July 2018

Emily Pope’s five-part web series, The Sitcom Show, is a throwback to the chameleonic class-consciousness and wry pessimism-as-realism embodied by the vein of British pop culture...

READ NEXT

fiction

February 2014

Coral

R. B. Pillay

fiction

February 2014

Early one morning, you wake up with the smell of burnt sheets in your nose, the sheets that you...

fiction

April 2012

They Told the Story from the Lighthouse

Chimene Suleyman

fiction

April 2012

I found Margate watching the sea. And I walked the streets thinking they had left it sometime in the...

fiction

April 2013

How to be an Astronaut

J. D. A. Winslow

fiction

April 2013

I am standing in front of a room full of people reading out a story. The room is dark....

 

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