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Dead Unicorns: Apocalyptic Anxiety in Canadian Art

Art

Issue No. 3

Vanessa Nicholas

Art

Issue No. 3

David Altmejd’s installation for the Canada Pavilion at the 2007 Venice Biennale was a complex labyrinth of ferns, nests and caves littered with stuffed...

Interview

Issue No. 3

Interview with Elmgreen & Dragset

Ben Hunter

Nicholas Shorvon

Interview

Issue No. 3

Michael Elmgreen and Ingar Dragset are among the most innovative, subversive and wickedly funny contemporary artists at work, or...

feature

October 2011

This is not the place: Perec, the Situationists and Belleville

Karl Whitney

feature

October 2011

I stood near the columbarium at Père Lachaise cemetery. I was there to see the locker-like vault containing the...

feature

October 2011

The White Review No.3 Editorial

The Editors

feature

October 2011

In the course of putting three issues of The White Review together, the editors have been presented with the...

feature

October 2011

The New Global Literature? Marjane Satrapi and the Depiction of Conflict in Comics

Jessica Copley

feature

October 2011

Over the last ten years graphic novels have undergone a transformation in the collective literary consciousness. Readers, editors and...

Art

Issue No. 3

Borism

Lee Rourke

Oliver Griffin

Art

Issue No. 3

ES9 is the latest body of work by Oliver Griffin in his archival series The Evaluation of Space. Taken...

Interview with Michael Hardt

Interview

Issue No. 2

Chris Catanese

Karim Wissa

Interview

Issue No. 2

Michael Hardt is a philosopher and theorist best known for his collaboration with Antonio Negri on a trilogy of political treatises — Empire, Multitude,...

Art

September 2011

Interview with Marnie Weber

Timothée Chaillou

Art

September 2011

Los Angeles-based artist Marnie Weber has spent her career weaving music, performance, collage, photography and performance together into her...

Art

September 2011

Interview with Cornelia Parker

Lowenna Waters

Art

September 2011

Cornelia Parker has over the past twenty years carved out a reputation as one of Britain’s most respected sculptors...

ARTISTIC COLLABORATION, in all disciplines, is — and has ever been — the exception In its unmitigated form — taking place between two or more individuals working to one end, and with the particulars of responsibility dissolved in consensus — collaboration has proven to be a versatile and available mode of artistic production   So why is collaboration given so wide a berth? That, historically, so large a proportion of collaborative works come over apologetic — mollifying their collaborative character — would suggest that it is in the understanding of collaborative art, and not the undertaking, where lies the issue And for this reason: collaborative art overturns our perception of ‘the artist’, to which we hold fast, even if we don’t know it   It is important to clarify what I mean by collaboration There are media that necessarily utilise a workforce, the craftsmanship of others, that are inherently ‘collaborative’ but to which, for the purposes of this article, we will not apply the term collaboration A big-scale beehive of a collaborative endeavour, a film congregates large numbers of individuals, each a satellite contributor and specialist — in cinematography, animation, sound or wardrobe design But if a film’s achievement may be credited to individuals in titled, subsidiary roles, it cannot satisfactorily be called a collaboration How far can a film’s scriptwriter be said to have collaborated with its stunt man? There is no transaction of ideas, no arbitration; they are connected indirectly by an intermediary in the form or forms of director and producer Collaboration in film, and to the same degree, theatre, is contingent upon a selection or hiring process; ‘collaborators’ are delegated to and in most circumstances work apart In the critical theory of François Truffaut and other contributors to Cahiers du Cinéma, the success (or failure) of a film is attributable only to its director, Truffaut’s apiculturist ‘auteur’ If I am inclined to disagree with Truffaut’s solo-project take on the film industry, I am also unable to name his cameramen, his editors, his supporting casts Ai Weiwei’s Sunflower Seeds is a similar instance of the figure-headed or curated ‘collective’ artwork The Beijing artist employed over a thousand

 

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