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Issue No. 21

The Editors

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Issue No. 21

In 2013 we encountered a pamphlet-sized book published by n+1 called No Regrets. It contained a series of conversations between different groups of women...

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March 2018

Editorial

The Editors

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March 2018

During his interview with Claudia Rankine in this issue, Kayo Chingonyi raises the subject of what role the arts...

No terrain is impossible for the Urban Cyclist His powerful legs drive the pedals down in alternation, right, left, right, left, calculating the degree of incline by the strength required of his thigh and calf muscles for each complete revolution of the front sprocket The soles of his feet and palms of his hands read each vibration transferred from the tyres to the handlebars and frame, making micro-adjustments to his direction and balance at a speed faster than thought The initial uphill stretch when he first leaves the house is short and serves to lubricate his joints and warm up his muscles He quickly reaches Reservation Street Its sloping cobbled lanes are separated by a grassy central reservation Five blocks to The Strip Knowing every inch of the way like the back of his hand doesn’t make the challenge any less dangerous for the Urban Cyclist From one week to the next, so much can change A resident might decide to have a new driveway put in so they can park their car in the garage more comfortably, and may have to deposit mounds of sand, gravel and cement in the middle of the pavement, an example of the kind of mutant obstacle for which the true Urban Cyclist must be prepared There are dogs that shoot out like rockets from behind walls to try to snaffle a bit of their favourite food, an unwary cyclist’s shin Even trees, an apparently peaceful and inoffensive element of the natural world, from one week to the next push out branches and roots, which can obstruct the Cyclist’s path Weeds sprout from the pavement, concealing pebbles, holes and bricks that can catch one by surprise and cause serious accidents from which only the most skilled, experienced cyclists emerge unscathed   The day is auspicious for a high-risk, high-speed ride It’s chilly out, with a cold wind of medium intensity and a clear sky Although the wind causes certain discomfort, whipping the Cyclist’s face and making breathing difficult, it means he perspires less, thus reducing the need to wipe sweat from his eyes and the

Contributor

August 2014

The Editors

Contributor

August 2014

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September 2017

On The White Review Anthology

The Editors

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September 2017

Valentine’s Day 2010, Brooklyn: an intern at the Paris Review skips his shift as an undocumented worker at an...

Valentine’s Day 2010, Brooklyn: an intern at the Paris Review skips his shift as an undocumented worker at an Upper East Side restaurant to have drinks with a BBC journalist and art critic visiting New York The White Review is born, or at least the drunken idea of it   A year later we launched the first print issue at Daunt Books in London’s Cheapside An unholy coalition between the Conservatives and Liberal Democrats had recently formed a government, promptly tripling tuition fees and sparking protests The first shots in the Arab Spring had been fired; anti-austerity protests in Greece exposed cracks in the facade of European solidarity that would swiftly widen; Donald Trump was briefly a frontrunner for the Republican candidacy, though his eventual decision not to stand still felt then like the inevitable triumph of sanity over satire Meanwhile, print journalism and book publishing was dying a slow death – remember the digital revolution? – and we intended to do something, though we didn’t know quite what, about it     The desire to launch a magazine was born out of our respective frustrations at the state of contemporary publishing in London, and indeed cultural and political commentary in the United Kingdom Where could an aspiring writer-critic-editor (whatever it was we were back then) hope to get published? The established literary magazines at home seemed to be closed shops, conservative either in their politics or their tastes (there were exceptions, we discovered retrospectively, among them the poetry journals Clinic and Popshot) We lamented the decline of cultural criticism and essay-length journalism, forms which seemed increasingly in danger of confinement to the ivory tower We were exasperated that the visual arts, so central to London’s culture, were so often made inaccessible to audiences without the theoretical training demanded by gatekeepers determined to protect their own territory So, inspired by the success of little magazines in New York – The Paris Review, n1,
Valentine’s Day 2010, Brooklyn: an intern at the Paris Review skips his shift as an undocumented worker at an Upper East Side restaurant to have drinks with a BBC journalist and art critic visiting New York The White Review is born, or at least the drunken idea of it   A year later we launched the first print issue at Daunt Books in London’s Cheapside An unholy coalition between the Conservatives and Liberal Democrats had recently formed a government, promptly tripling tuition fees and sparking protests The first shots in the Arab Spring had been fired; anti-austerity protests in Greece exposed cracks in the facade of European solidarity that would swiftly widen; Donald Trump was briefly a frontrunner for the Republican candidacy, though his eventual decision not to stand still felt then like the inevitable triumph of sanity over satire Meanwhile, print journalism and book publishing was dying a slow death – remember the digital revolution? – and we intended to do something, though we didn’t know quite what, about it     The desire to launch a magazine was born out of our respective frustrations at the state of contemporary publishing in London, and indeed cultural and political commentary in the United Kingdom Where could an aspiring writer-critic-editor (whatever it was we were back then) hope to get published? The established literary magazines at home seemed to be closed shops, conservative either in their politics or their tastes (there were exceptions, we discovered retrospectively, among them the poetry journals Clinic and Popshot) We lamented the decline of cultural criticism and essay-length journalism, forms which seemed increasingly in danger of confinement to the ivory tower We were exasperated that the visual arts, so central to London’s culture, were so often made inaccessible to audiences without the theoretical training demanded by gatekeepers determined to protect their own territory So, inspired by the success of little magazines in New York – The Paris Review, n1,
Editorial

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Issue No. 20

The Editors

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Issue No. 20

    As a bookish schoolchild in Galilee, the Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish was invited to compose, and read in public, a poem marking...

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Issue No. 19

Editorial

The Editors

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Issue No. 19

‘A crisis becomes a crisis when the white male body is affected,’ writes the philosopher Rosi Braidotti, interviewed in...

‘A crisis becomes a crisis when the white male body is affected,’ writes the philosopher Rosi Braidotti, interviewed in this nineteenth print issue of The White Review Braidotti’s work on the posthuman challenges all forms of supremacy – from humans’ abuse of the environment to deep-rooted racial and gender inequalities – in favour of a more expansive, less hierarchical view of humanity At a time when accelerating movements in global politics are propounding constricted views of who may be classed as ‘human’ and accordingly entitled to bodily autonomy – those who are white, male, heterosexual, rich, native-born – it feels imperative that we continue to seek out voices and narratives outside this shrinking mainstream We are wary, however, of providing another platform for agitprop and the conveyor belt of hastily expiring hot takes Instead we have sought to put together in this issue a collection of writing that is nuanced and reflective, curious and exacting; that will provide solace where required and spur inspiration elsewhere   Since the US election campaign, where debates turned on whether or not a female candidate was capable of withstanding the strain of a presidency, women’s bodies – coded as weak and frail, somehow imparting irrationality, and requiring subordination to male control – have been at the forefront of Trump’s sickening boasts and discriminatory policy-making Women who terminate pregnancies must be ‘punished’, Trump said in March 2016, before using one of his very first acts as president to police women’s control over their own bodies by reinstating a 1980s law denying funding to organisations which perform or provide information about abortions (‘Pro-life’ campaigners might note that during the 1950s and ‘60s, when abortion was legal in only four states, ‘back alley’ terminations accounted for 17 per cent of maternal deaths) Our protest comes in the form of fictions, essays, poems and works of art which interrogate constructions of the female body Jacqueline Feldman follows a group of Femen activists who have turned their bodies into vehicles of protest, and explores the way these women have been alternately vilified, patronised and objectified for exposing their bodies in

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Issue No. 18

Editorial

The Editors

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Issue No. 18

This is the editorial from the eighteenth print issue of The White Review, available to buy here.    In 1991...

This is the editorial from the eighteenth print issue of The White Review, available to buy here    In 1991 the poet and novelist Eileen Myles, interviewed in this eighteenth print issue of The White Review, ran for office as president of the United States It seems unlikely that any editor of this magazine will ever run for high office, though given the current chaos on both sides of the Atlantic it would be foolish to make any firm predictions In the presumably permanent absence of direct legislative influence, we are faced with the pressing question of how a magazine can contribute to a democratic process which seems everywhere under threat The temptation is to throw the meagre weight of this small institution behind policies and strategies that reflect our own convictions, and to transform it into a mouthpiece for the dissemination of ideas that collectively communicate a coherent and actionable political position   Yet, as this country recovers from the most divisive political event in a generation, we might pause to consider the responsibilities of the magazine as a space for open dialogue The campaign to remain in the European Union failed in large part because it presumed the self-evidence of its case and shied away from antagonistic discussion in favour of a browbeating insistence that the political establishment (and such institutions as the IMF) knew what was right for our communities In Brexit’s wake it became routine to hear expressed (and rare to hear challenged) the conviction that an outright majority of the population were incapable of making a decision in their own interests, when even the most cursory glance at that dysfunctional, autocratic union revealed good (which isn’t necessarily to say sufficient) reasons for leaving The implication that a large part of the citizenry does not deserve the franchise is deeply troubling   In retrospect, it might be that the overwhelming consensus of the literary and art establishments in opposition to Brexit was a symptom of weakness rather than strength Our magazines and art spaces have always operated as arenas for the exchange of disruptive ideas, forums for what the

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Issue No. 17

Editorial

The Editors

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Issue No. 17

An Englishman, a Frenchman and an Irishman set up a magazine in London in 2010. This sounds like the...

An Englishman, a Frenchman and an Irishman set up a magazine in London in 2010 This sounds like the beginning of a joke, but when we wrote this just over a week ago, it seemed probable, almost inevitable, that Britain would have voted to leave the EU by the time our next print issue is on press Post-Brexit, might it be possible for three EU citizens on low incomes to set up an arts and literature magazine in the UK? Rien n’est moins sûr   The ‘Life in the United Kingdom Test’ is a test for individuals seeking indefinite Leave to Remain in the UK or naturalisation as a British citizen The test lasts for forty-five minutes, the entrants have to answer twenty-four questions As of 1 June 2016, it costs £50 to take the test (up from £34) It is a compulsory part of an application for British citizenship or settlement in the UK Naturalisation costs an additional £1,236 If the polls at the time of writing prove to be correct, two of the founders of The White Review will be taking this test very soon   These are some of the questions they may be asked:   There is no place in British society for extremism or intolerance a) True b) False   All dogs in public places must wear: a) A collar with the name and address of the owner b) Wellington boots for big puddles c) Sunglasses on a sunny day to avoid eye damage d) A raincoat in wet weather   Who had a great influence on the English language and invented many words that are still common today? a) Edward Thomas b) William Blake c) William Shakespeare d) Wilfred Owen   What is the correct order of the national days? a) St George’s Day, St David’s Day, St Patrick’s Day, St Andrew’s Day b) St David’s Day, St Patrick’s Day, St George’s Day, St Andrew’s Day c) St Patrick’s Day, St David’s Day, St Andrew’s Day, St George’s Day d) St David’s Day, St Patrick’s Day, St Andrew’s Day, St George’s Day   Pubs are usually open from: a) 8 am b) 9 am c) 10 am d) 11 am   ‘The Enlightenment’ is known as: a) New ideas about politics, philosophy and

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Issue No. 16

Editorial

The Editors

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Issue No. 16

The political and internet activist Eli Pariser coined the term ‘Filter Bubble’ in 2011 to describe how we have...

The political and internet activist Eli Pariser coined the term ‘Filter Bubble’ in 2011 to describe how we have become sheltered from opinions that differ from our own Pointing the finger at such mechanisms as social media streams and the ‘personalised’ results delivered by online search engines, he warned that the online experience of news and culture was coming to resemble an echo chamber Our Twitter and Facebook feeds repeat back to us our own points of view, expressed by others who share them; our browsing history makes it possible for advertisers and news sites to guide us towards other things that its algorithms suggest we ‘might like’, shielding us from anything that we might not like, anything new We become entrenched in our opinions, unable to understand, enter into dialogue with, or even countenance difference The polarisation of political perspectives in the United Kingdom, United States, and across Europe seems increasingly to bear out this analysis   It is our hope that little magazines such as The White Review might in some small way work against this tendency towards intellectual isolation, the withdrawal into what Pariser calls a ‘personal ecosystem’ We are privileged to be able to place together radically different things within the pages of a single publication That is much in evidence in this issue, which juxtaposes the systemic critique of Martin MacInnes with Elizabeth Peyton’s emotionally charged still lifes and portraits; a discussion of Cally Spooner’s scripted performances against the lyrical experimentalism of Geoffrey G O’Brien’s poetry; Evan Harris’s attempts to find the appropriate form for his experience of the failures of British education beside Sophie Seita’s investigations into the properties of language The art critic Orit Gat investigates the tendency towards homogeneity in the way that art is presented on the internet, and calls for a new plurality We hope that print publications such as ours can offer new and surprising encounters   Yet, as we have noted in previous editorials, patterns seem to emerge in each issue, though their form might (like clouds) be informed by the reader’s own state of mind The reminiscence prompted by the
The political and internet activist Eli Pariser coined the term ‘Filter Bubble’ in 2011 to describe how we have become sheltered from opinions that differ from our own Pointing the finger at such mechanisms as social media streams and the ‘personalised’ results delivered by online search engines, he warned that the online experience of news and culture was coming to resemble an echo chamber Our Twitter and Facebook feeds repeat back to us our own points of view, expressed by others who share them; our browsing history makes it possible for advertisers and news sites to guide us towards other things that its algorithms suggest we ‘might like’, shielding us from anything that we might not like, anything new We become entrenched in our opinions, unable to understand, enter into dialogue with, or even countenance difference The polarisation of political perspectives in the United Kingdom, United States, and across Europe seems increasingly to bear out this analysis   It is our hope that little magazines such as The White Review might in some small way work against this tendency towards intellectual isolation, the withdrawal into what Pariser calls a ‘personal ecosystem’ We are privileged to be able to place together radically different things within the pages of a single publication That is much in evidence in this issue, which juxtaposes the systemic critique of Martin MacInnes with Elizabeth Peyton’s emotionally charged still lifes and portraits; a discussion of Cally Spooner’s scripted performances against the lyrical experimentalism of Geoffrey G O’Brien’s poetry; Evan Harris’s attempts to find the appropriate form for his experience of the failures of British education beside Sophie Seita’s investigations into the properties of language The art critic Orit Gat investigates the tendency towards homogeneity in the way that art is presented on the internet, and calls for a new plurality We hope that print publications such as ours can offer new and surprising encounters   Yet, as we have noted in previous editorials, patterns seem to emerge in each issue, though their form might (like clouds) be informed by the reader’s own state of mind The reminiscence prompted by the

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Issue No. 15

Editorial

The Editors

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Issue No. 15

In The Art of the Publisher, Roberto Calasso suggests that publishing is something approaching an art form, whereby ‘all...

In The Art of the Publisher, Roberto Calasso suggests that publishing is something approaching an art form, whereby ‘all books published by a certain publisher could be seen as links in a single chain, or segments in a serpentine progression of books, or fragments in a single book formed by all the books published by that publisher’ A publisher’s success can be judged, he continues, by its ‘capacity to give form to a plurality of books as though they were the chapters of a single book All this while taking care – a passionate and obsessive care – over the appearance of every volume, over the way in which it is presented’ With these words Calasso, the legendary director of Italian publishing house Adelphi, captures something of what we attempt with each new issue of The White Review, considering it in relation to its predecessors as a new segment in a serpentine progression, or one fragment of a single and as yet incomplete book   Indeed, in this issue can be seen a continuation of the same themes that have preoccupied us since the beginning of this quixotic publishing venture New literature in translation – from the extraordinary French novelist Maylis de Kerangal, the great Hungarian László Krasznahorkai and the celebrated Korean poet Ko Un – is complemented by some of the most exciting voices to have emerged from Britain and Ireland over recent years in Caleb Klaces, Declan Ryan and Luke Brown Our dedication to hybrid, radical forms is apparent in the publication of Anne Carson’s ‘lyric lecture with chorus’ – a work that could as easily be produced on stage or film as within these pages – and Brian Dillon’s ekphrastic meditation on charisma, faith, and loss The combination of art and literature has always been a guiding principle of this project, and here we are delighted to present works by installation artist Alicja Kwade, a photographic series from Germany’s Annette Kelm, and new work by Swiss artists Taiyo Onorato & Nico Krebs Our catholic (a generous interpretation) tastes are reflected in the publication of a long-form essay on
Editorial

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Issue No. 14

The Editors

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Issue No. 14

Having several issues ago announced that we would no longer be writing our own editorials, the editors’ (ultimately inevitable) failure to organise a replacement,...
Editorial

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Issue No. 10

The Editors

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Issue No. 10

This tenth editorial will be our last. Back in February 2011, on launching the magazine, we grandiosely stated that we were ‘creating a space for...
The White Review No. 9 Editorial

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Issue No. 9

The Editors

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Issue No. 9

This ninth print issue of The White Review is characterised by little more than the continuation of the principles we have set out in...
The White Review No. 8 Editorial

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Issue No. 8

The Editors

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Issue No. 8

The manifesto of art collective Bruce High Quality foundation, the subject of an essay by Legacy Russell in this issue, states its intention to...
The White Review No. 7 Editorial

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Issue No. 7

The Editors

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Issue No. 7

A few issues back we grandiosely stated ‘that it is more important now than ever to provide a forum for expression and debate’. This...
The White Review No. 6 Editorial

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Issue No. 6

The Editors

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Issue No. 6

By the looks of it, not much has changed for The White Review. This new edition, like its predecessors, features the customary blend of...
The White Review No. 5 Editorial

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Issue No. 5

The Editors

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Issue No. 5

One of the two editors of The White Review recently committed a faux pas by reacting with undisguised and indeed excessive envy to the revelation...
The White Review No. 4 Editorial

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Issue No. 4

The Editors

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Issue No. 4

We live in interesting times. A few years ago, with little warning and for reasons obscure to all but a few, an economic system...
The White Review No.3 Editorial

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October 2011

The Editors

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October 2011

In the course of putting three issues of The White Review together, the editors have been presented with the problems they were previously so...
Editorial: a thousand witnesses are better than conscience

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July 2011

The Editors

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July 2011

The closure of any newspaper is a cause for sadness in any country that prides itself, as Britain does, on its possession of a...

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Art

January 2017

New Communities

Robert Assaye

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January 2017

DeviantArt is the world’s ‘largest online community of artists and art-lovers’ and its thirteenth largest social network. Its forty...

Prize Entry

April 2015

Smote, or ...

Eley Williams

Prize Entry

April 2015

To kiss you should not involve such fear of imprecision. I shouldn’t mind about the gallery attendant. He is...

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Issue No. 9

Ordinary Voids

Ed Aves

Patrick Langley

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Issue No. 9

I am standing in a parallelogram of shrubbery outside London City Airport. Ed is twisting a dial on his Mamiya...

 

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