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Skye Arundhati Thomas
Skye Arundhati Thomas is a writer and editor based in Mumbai.

Articles Available Online


Simryn Gill, Soft Tissue

Art Review

February 2019

Skye Arundhati Thomas

Art Review

February 2019

I walked into Simryn Gill’s exhibition SOFT TISSUE at Jhaveri Contemporary on one of the worst days of an unusually dense winter smog in...

Art Review

February 2018

Bani Abidi & Naeem Mohaiemen, I wish to let you fall out of my hands (Chapter 1)

Skye Arundhati Thomas

Art Review

February 2018

Loneliness is mostly narrative. It also has an aesthetic: an empty tableau in which the lonely act is performed....

It is a two lane road somewhere in North America The car is pulled onto the shoulder with the brake lights on A grey midrange sedan from twenty years ago The road is edged on both sides by thin half bare trees It is winter, autumn, or spring The day is blank, covered in high cloud Now and then another vehicle goes by A police officer walks forward, gun drawn, towards the driverside door of the midrange sedan He is state police and wears the felt hat and the uniform with the thick dark stripe on the outside trouser leg, the hat pinched at the top with the wide flat brim The shirt is tucked and tight round his paunch He is heavyset, thick-bodied He takes small steps, in a strong shooting stance There is someone inside the midrange sedan Through the back window there is a head, unclear, in silhouette They have not deserted the vehicle or fled the scene At least one person sat in the front Black dot birds scatter from the tops of the trees, and now and then another vehicle goes by The trooper is pointing with his right hand the gun through the window at the driver, and with his left hand he his reaching for the handle, going for the arrest He is shouting, has been shouting the whole time He pulls open the door and shouts at the driver He is pointing the gun and shouting at the driver He tells them get out of the car now He says get out of the fucking car He holsters the gun and pulls the driver from the sedan to the road The driver is female, Caucasian, middle-aged, and overweight She is facedown on the asphalt in her black slacks and baggy jumper, with the trooper on top of her, his knee on her back He hits her on the back of the head and unclips the handcuffs from his belt He is shouting, has been shouting the whole time He says get on the floor, get on the floor, I’ll cut your

Contributor

February 2018

Skye Arundhati Thomas

Contributor

February 2018

Skye Arundhati Thomas is a writer and editor based in Mumbai.

The characters in We That Are Young reside at ‘The Farm’ – a sprawling house in New Delhi complete with its own topiary of fat peacocks, bulbous pink flowers with English names, Fendi furniture, and a room in which it snows at the press of a button It’s not far removed from reality – Antilla, the world’s first billion-dollar residence for a single family of four, is a 40-storey building that towers over the suburbs of South Mumbai, replete with a staff of over 600 people, its own electrical power grid, ten-storey parking for a collection of unusable vintage cars, and a room, of course, where it snows on demand In dialogue with Shakespeare’s King Lear, Taneja’s debut novel explores the lives of a family that owns a multinational conglomerate, ‘The Company’, to which each character’s fate (and inheritance) is inextricably tied We have our patriarch, the Lear figure, Devraj; his three daughters Sita, Radha and Gargi; and his right-hand man Ranjit’s two sons, Jeet and Jivan The embarrassment of riches makes for an irresistible, if outlandish, setting; Taneja vividly indulges our intrigue in the way the rich conduct their daily lives, letting her words ooze out their luxury – filthy, yet so desirable After a particularly gruesome scene in which Radha administers the plucking out of a man’s eyes, she steps back into her suite and calls for a pot of first flush Assam, and rose macaroons   A reinterpretation of Shakespeare is the perfect postcolonial conquest: he remains the epitome of the Western canon, patriarchal, and repeatedly failing to include representations of the ‘other’ without recourse to parody Mainstream appropriations of Shakespeare in South Asia, such as Bollywood filmmaker Vishal Bharadwaj’s trilogy Maqbool (Macbeth), Omkara (Othello), and Haider (Hamlet), have generally taken us to rural settings, wherein tragedy is relegated to a matter of the lower castes Taneja, a Shakespearean academic and human rights activist, eschews such stereotypes, and goes straight for the jugular: the innate hypocrisy of the Indian class and caste system ‘It’s not about land, it’s about money,’ states the first line of the book, taking
Preti Taneja’s ‘We That Are Young’

Book Review

October 2017

Skye Arundhati Thomas


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James Brookes

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November 2011

LUCIFER AT CAMLANN In the drear fen of all scorn like a tooth unsheathed I shone for I too...

fiction

Issue No. 8

The Lady of the House

Claire-Louise Bennett

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Issue No. 8

Wow it’s so still. Isn’t it eerie. Oh yes. So calm. Everything’s still. That’s right. Look at the rowers...

Interview

March 2017

Interview with Bae Suah

Deborah Smith

Bae Suah

Interview

March 2017

The Essayist’s Desk, published in 2003 and written when its author Bae Suah had just returned from an 11-month...

 

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