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Leon Craig
Leon Craig’s writing has been published in the TLS3:AM MagazineReview 31, Storgy.com, Vice, Queen Mob's TeahouseFlight Journal and others. She is the co-editor of Thousand: An Anthology of Very Short Fiction, published by Brainchild Festival. She has just finished a short story collection, Parallel Hells.

Articles Available Online


Oscar Wilde Temple, Studio Voltaire

Art Review

April 2019

Leon Craig

Art Review

April 2019

The light is dim, the air richly scented. Little purple tea lights flicker in the votive candle rack and the walls are decorated with...

Feature

November 2018

[Getting] Down with Gal Pals

Leon Craig

Feature

November 2018

There’s a moment in Laura Kaye’s underrated novel English Animals when the protagonist Mirka, sitting in the village bar...

For almost the entirety of man’s recorded 50,000-year history the moon has been unattainable Alternately a heavenly body, the resting place of the gods, or a divine being itself, the moon’s earliest meanings for humanity were ultimately spiritual, if not purely sacred, largely because it was unattainable and the distance insurmountable: an enchanted, mysterious object The basic facts of the moon’s physical reality inform the fundamental structure of its role in both fiction and history A barren canvas, whose symbolic and ontological weight for humanity far outstrips its practical import (currently), the moon is frequently implicated in a complex reflection of earthbound power relations or cast as a mirror in which humanity apprehends its uglier truths   Viewing the moon as a political and commercial entity in the science fiction era allows us to trace a complicated web of interrelated meanings The Apollo programme of recent history, ostensibly about space exploration, represented a meeting of political, technological and ontological paradigms which created a global media spectacle Assumed to be the herald of a new age, the motives and cost of the Apollo programme have since been questioned The human impulse to travel to the moon was often couched in the edifying rhetoric of progression and nobility by the American government of the 1960s, but treatment of the subject in fiction and film both before and after the landings is typically and overtly marked by a deep-seated ambiguity surrounding the motives for exploring and/or colonising the moon, and often focus instead on the human cost associated with such grand imperatives   In H G Wells’s First Men in the Moon (1901), Philip K Dick’s The Man in the High Castle (1962) and Stanislaw Lem’s Peace on Earth (1987), the moon is deeply entangled in complex political agendas In H G Wells’s novel the two central protagonists embody blind, scientific instrumentalism on the one hand, and scheming, bloody, blundering capitalism on the other (These twin figures, used to critique imperialism by Wells, can incidentally be found in more recent science fiction such as James Cameron’s Avatar (2009)) Lem’s novel presents a satire of the Cold War from

Contributor

April 2016

Leon Craig

Contributor

April 2016

Leon Craig’s writing has been published in the TLS, 3:AM Magazine, Review 31, Storgy.com, Vice, Queen Mob’s Teahouse, Flight Journal and others. She is the co-editor of Thousand: An Anthology...

Mute Canticle

Prize Entry

April 2016

Leon Craig

Prize Entry

April 2016

Giulio the singing fascist came to pick me up from the little airport in his Jeep. He made sure to come round and hold...

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Art

Issue No. 11

Sarah Jones

Sarah Jones

Art

Issue No. 11

A series of photographs by the acclaimed British artist Sarah Jones is published in The White Review No. 11. 

poetry

August 2013

To the Woman

Adam Seelig

poetry

August 2013

poetry

February 2016

[from] What It Means to Be Avant-Garde

Anna Moschovakis

poetry

February 2016

This is an excerpt from the middle of a longer poem. The full poem is in Moschovakis’s forthcoming book,...

 

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