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Lauren Elkin

Lauren Elkin is the author of Flâneuse: Women Walk the City (Chatto & Windus/FSG), which was a New York Times Notable Book of 2017, a Radio 4 Book of the Week, and a finalist for the PEN/Diamondstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, the GuardianLe Mondefrieze, and the London Review of Books, among others, and she is a contributing editor to The White Review. She is currently working on her next book, Art Monsters: On Beauty and Excess (Chatto & Windus/FSG).



Articles Available Online


Maria Gainza’s ‘Optic Nerve’

Book Review

May 2019

Lauren Elkin

Book Review

May 2019

In his foreword to A Thousand Plateaus, on the pleasures of philosophy, and of Deleuze and Guattari’s philosophy in particular, Brian Massumi writes:  ...

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Issue No. 8

Barking From the Margins: On écriture féminine

Lauren Elkin

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Issue No. 8

 I. Two moments in May May 2, 2011. The novelists Siri Hustvedt and Céline Curiol are giving a talk...

The ‘beautiful disorder’ of the Forbidden City and the Yuanmingyuan (Garden of Perfection and Light) was first noted by the Jesuit painter Jean Denis Attiret in his 1749 account of Chinese architecture Confessing that ‘since my residence in China, my eyes and taste are grown a little Chinese’, the missionary admired the pleasure gardens’ ability to provoke violently opposing sensations in the viewer: the calm of beauty and the energy of chaos It was an observation that would influence the design of ornamental English gardens such as that which now hosts an exhibition of contemporary Chinese art at CASS Sculpture Foundation, in leafy Sussex   Landscape aesthetics seem like an oddly anachronistic starting point for a survey of emerging art from China: deploying an Old World commentary on the Oriental garden that salutes its follies and theatrical framings of nature, Attiret’s report positioned the garden as microcosm for the society on which he was, obliquely, reporting More pertinent, perhaps, is the relationship between the garden and expressions of heroic nationalism implied by his appraisal of the Emperor’s palace and pleasure gardens To make outdoor public sculpture is to monumentalise, or to comment on monumentalism We associate the form with memorials to war, heroic individuals, or national leadership   Much of the work on show at CASS addresses this tendency Song Ta, an artist from the factory city of Guangzhou in southern China, has transported a vast bust of Mao to the English woodlands It shows a boyish leader with windswept hair and pouting lips, a version of a sculpture which is widely found in China but looks strange to those of us familiar only with Mao’s later portraits (such as that appropriated for Warhol’s screenprinted Mao, 1972) Ta has painted the surrounding trees stone grey to match the colour of his Mao, creating an antic photo opportunity for onlookers Likewise, sisters Cao Fei (interviewed in the June 2016 online issue of The White Review) and Cao Dan reflect upon the history of monumental sculpture in two video works about their father, the social realist sculptor Cao Chong’en His bronze statues of

Contributor

August 2014

Lauren Elkin

Contributor

August 2014

Lauren Elkin is the author of Flâneuse: Women Walk the City (Chatto & Windus/FSG), which was a New York Times Notable...

The End of Francophonie: The Politics of French Literature

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Issue No. 2

Lauren Elkin

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Issue No. 2

I. We were a couple of minutes late for the panel we’d hoped to attend. The doors were closed and there was a surly-looking...

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Art

May 2016

Sharon Hayes

Edwina Attlee

Art

May 2016

Sharon Hayes’ In My Little Corner of the World, Anyone Would Love You at Studio Voltaire features a five-channel...

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Issue No. 3

Forkhead Box

Jeremy M. Davies

fiction

Issue No. 3

What interests me most is that Schaumann, the state executioner, bred mice. In his spare time. Sirens, ozone, exhaust...

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Issue No. 4

The White Review No. 4 Editorial

The Editors

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Issue No. 4

We live in interesting times. A few years ago, with little warning and for reasons obscure to all but...

 

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